Snider 1868 Cartridges and Barrel

Item #C84

Snider 1868 Cartridges and Barrel

  • Price: $2,695.00 CAD
  • Maker: Enfield
  • Model: Snider
  • Caliber/Gauge: .577

  • Description:

    We are pleased to offer a unique museum or advanced collector grade item.  This piece is an original 1868 Royal Laboratory quarter barrel built for the shipment of blank cartridges for the Snider rifles .577 pattern II.  The barrel was found with the complete bottom layer of 18 packets of blank cartridges in place as originally packed in 1868.  This pattern of cartridge was approved on the 4th of April 1867 included is the copy of the original specks as reproduced on page 48 and 49 of "British War Materials " Vol 1 by Ian Skennerton .  The signifigance of the rarity of this item is as follows: The barrel remains in its' original as issued and used condition.  The barrel retains eight of the original sapling loops.  The two piece top remains and is as marked 5/5/68 over S/2/R, stamped 1868.  These tops were built in two pieces and joined with two wood dowels.  When the sealed top was struck, the dowels broke sepearting the top and allowing access to the cartridges.  Usually the tops were discarded or lost.  In addition to the bottom layer of packets,  this barrel still retains its original paper liner.  The paper is the same material as used to produce the packets.  The bottom shows the stenciled date 5/5/68 and the remnants of the bottom label.  All markings on the barrel conform with the 10th March 1868 Directive re the marking on the top of the barrel.  In May of 1868 the Directive was issued mandating the use of wood ammunition boxes.  This was followed by the Directive of 17 Feb 1877 that all small arm ammunition boxes be lined with tin and that the existing store of quarter barrels be used up by the service.  This barrel was sourced out of Halifax, Nova Scotia.  There is little doubt that this barrel was shipped to one of the British units based in Halifax in the period of this item.  This piece is an item produced in a very small time frame.  It's rarity is also reflected by the fact that it has remained intact and has survived in its present condtiion for approximately 150 years.  A unique piece for any serious British Military or Ammunition Collector.